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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 114-115

Brainstorming: A tool to facilitate learning among undergraduate medical students


1 Department of Community Medicine, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Medical Research Unit, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication27-Nov-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh Rambiharilal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, 3rd Floor, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjmsr.mjmsr_19_18

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Brainstorming: A tool to facilitate learning among undergraduate medical students. Muller J Med Sci Res 2018;9:114-5

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Brainstorming: A tool to facilitate learning among undergraduate medical students. Muller J Med Sci Res [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 11];9:114-5. Available from: http://www.mjmsr.net/text.asp?2018/9/2/114/246163



Dear Editor,

Brainstorming is an effective teaching–learning method which can be employed more effectively in small group teaching, with an aim to reach a conclusion for an identified problem by means of considering various solutions proposed by the participants.[1] In fact, a large group can be divided into multiple smaller groups, and the technique can be adopted even in large group teaching.[1] It is an interactive teaching–learning approach which is employed not only to break the monotony of a lecture class but also to activate the knowledge of undergraduate students regarding the topic.[1],[2] The idea is to promote interaction among the participants or the group members by providing them with an open forum to equally participate and cite their ideas for the given problem.[1]

The method is utilized with an intention to promote concentration of the undergraduate students and to generate a large number of ideas on the topic of interest.[1],[3] In addition, it sensitizes the students that before starting any activity (like writing or solving problems), it is a good practice to collect a variety of ideas.[2] Moreover, the method gives a scope for the undergraduate students to share their views and expand their levels of existing knowledge.[2] Furthermore, it teaches the students to work as a member of a team, in which each member is allowed to share their ideas and opinions and that their views are respected, valued, and accepted.[2],[3] Further, this technique provides them with an outline regarding what all to learn during a lecture and eventually paves the way to become a self-directed learner.[1],[2],[3]

In general, the sessions begin with the facilitator giving a brief introduction of the scenario or problem to the students and should specify the aim of the session clearly so that appropriate and useful responses can be obtained from the students.[1] Usually, for facilitating the session, a flipchart is required, and the facilitator should record everything on the same so that all the students can see the progression of the discussion.[2] As the session advances, each of the participating students realizes about the views of other students and even ascertains their learning gaps.[1],[3]

However, the success of brainstorming session is determined by a wide range of parameters, such as acknowledging all ideas without criticizing or judging them, equal weightage to all the ideas, giving emphasis on quantity and not quality, build upon the ideas shared by others, and eventually ending the session by combining similar ideas into one possible solution (or logical conclusion).[1],[2],[3] In addition, the facilitator should give enough space to ensure that even shy students should participate in the discussion and that the extroverts should not be the only one talking throughout.[3] Furthermore, this teaching–learning method would not give the results, if time limits are not specified or discussions are not regulated.[1]

In conclusion, the brainstorming method aids in improving the participation of undergraduate medical students and also plays a crucial role in promoting creativity, acquisition of problem-solving skills, and the expansion of the existing knowledge by taking into account views of other students.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Annamalai N, Manivel R, Palanisamy R. Small group discussion: Students perspectives. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2015;5:S18-20.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Dickinson H. How to make the most out of brainstorming. Nurs Times 2011;107:37.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Goswami B, Jain A, Koner BC. Evaluation of brainstorming session as a teaching-learning tool among postgraduate medical biochemistry students. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2017;7:S15-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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