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FMCI ARCHIVE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 44

Excerpts from the article by Mr. Edward Gonsalves published in the FMCI centenary souvenir


Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, India

Date of Web Publication20-May-2013

Correspondence Address:
Denis D'Sa
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/0975-9727.112290

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How to cite this article:
D'Sa D. Excerpts from the article by Mr. Edward Gonsalves published in the FMCI centenary souvenir. Muller J Med Sci Res 2013;4:44

How to cite this URL:
D'Sa D. Excerpts from the article by Mr. Edward Gonsalves published in the FMCI centenary souvenir. Muller J Med Sci Res [serial online] 2013 [cited 2022 Jan 21];4:44. Available from: https://www.mjmsr.net/text.asp?2013/4/1/44/112290


  A Short History of the Institutions Top


Meantime, in 1895, after 5 years of homoeopathy treatment of leprosy, Fr Muller, was not happy with the results, decided on the construction of the allopathic hospital referred to above. Two large wards for male and female patients with a small chapel between them were built with Rs. 7705/- raised in Mangalore and a substantial donation of Rs. 2395/- from the Count Caesar Mattei of Bologna. The names of the donors have been inscribed on a marble plaque in the visitors' room. Paintings of the great artist Brother Moscheni whose murals in St. Aloysius College Chapel are still the wonder of visitors, adorn the walls of this Oratory.

In 1901, a new block mainly for women, appears to have become necessary, and was built at a cost of Rs. 12,000/-. Both this hospital and the older one had a poor home attached to them where the destitute were housed.

The increased accommodation necessarily meant more water. Two wells were sunk in addition to a large one 18 feet in diameter and 25 feet deep (20 feet being solid rock), provided with a 16 foot aerometer below ground level, and a smaller auxiliary above the ground. The total outlay was Rs. 4000/-.

In 1902, an epidemic, the Bubonic Plague, sent all Mangalore panicky. Fr Muller, besieged with entreaties from the public, supported by Bishop Cavadini and Judge D. D. Murdoch, Collector, went to work with a sense of urgency and in a matter of just 27 days, had a plague hospital, 75 by 45 feet, erected out of a collection of Rs. 4524/- handed over to him. The building was large enough for 24 patients. Later six temporary sheds were put up for the Hindu patients, and a total of 128 patients were treated in the hospital.

In 1907, the same building being vacant was turned into a Cholera camp. Out of 210 patients treated for the deadly epidemic, 156 are reported to have been saved from certain death.

So renowned and appreciated were the Founder's efforts in the alleviation of suffering that no VIP itineraries were ever complete without a visit to Fr Muller's. Thus, we have Lord and Lady Wenlock visiting the hospital on 22 nd October 1893, Sir Arthur Havelock on 4 th October 1896 and Lord and Lady Ampthel on 23 rd October 1901. Sir Arthur Lawley presented Fr Muller the Kaiser-i-Hind medal at a public durbar held on 4.11.1907.

The unremitting labor of 29 long years took its toll of health, and Fr Muller could not be saved even by a change to places in India. For almost 10 months from January 1910, the good Father ailed from asthma and cardiac trouble, staging a brief recovery from time to time. Sir Arthur Lawley sent a telegram on August 15, assuring the patient of his sympathy. However, the end had come, and on the 1 st of November 1910, he passed on to his Lord at the age of 69. His remains were interred in the Leper Asylum Chapel as he had desired them to be. As Sir Arthur Lawley said in his letter of condolence, India had "lost one of its celebrities and one of its greatest benefactors."

A tribute paid in more recent times to Fr Muller seems in place here. Dr. K. N. Katju, Union Home Minister, visiting Mangalore in 1953 insisted on going to Fr Muller's. Arrived there, he declined to go round the Hospital. He wanted to see three things first: (i) The chest of medicines Fr Muller brought with him from Germany, (ii) The room where he worked and (iii) the chair he sat in. And he added, "I am a hero-worshipper; Fr Muller was one of my heroes."




 

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